Sundarban Project
# Vintage
Creating Alternative Opportunities for the Residents of Forest Fringe Villages of Sundarbans to Reduce the Human and Wild Interaction
Sundarban Project
# Vintage
Creating Alternative Opportunities for the Residents of Forest Fringe Villages of Sundarbans to Reduce the Human and Wild Interaction
Sundarban Project
# Vintage
Creating Alternative Opportunities for the Residents of Forest Fringe Villages of Sundarbans to Reduce the Human and Wild Interaction
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About Indian Sundarbans

The Sundarbans is a vast forest in the coastal region of the Bay of Bengal and considered one of the natural wonders of the world. Located in the delta region of Padma, Meghna and Brahmaputra river basins, this unique forest extends across Khulna, Satkhira, Bagerhat districts of Bangladesh and South 24 Parganas, North 24 Parganas districts of West Bengal, India. The Sundarbans contain the world’s largest coastal mangrove forest, with an area of about 10,000 km2 (3,900 sq mi), of which about 6,000 km2 (2,300 sq mi) are located in Bangladesh and about 4,000 km2 (1,500 sq mi) in India. The Bangladeshi and Indian parts of the Sundarbans, while in fact adjacent parts of the uninterrupted landscape, have been listed separately in the UNESCO World Heritage List: as Sundarbans and Sundarbans National Park, respectively. Both parts are also recognized as Ramsar sites.

The name Sundarban can be literally translated as “beautiful forest” in the Bengali language (Shundôr, “beautiful” and bôn, “forest”). The name may have been derived from the Sundari trees (the mangrove species Heritiera fomes) that are found in Sundarbans in large numbers. Alternatively, it has been proposed that the name is a corruption of Samudraban, Shomudrobôn (“Sea Forest”), or Chandra-bandhe (name of a primitive tribe). However, the generally accepted view is the one associated with Sundari or Sundri trees. (Source: www.wikipedia.org)

How we work

Mobilization & Cluster Development

After initiating a base level survey we created a need analysis report. With the help of that report we mobilized our beneficiaries from Joint Forest Management Committee (JFMC) areas of Sundarban Tiger Reserve. We have also created small clusters based on different projects.

Capacity Building Training

We provided different skill development training support to the selected beneficiaries. After the workshop we provided additional training support on the quality measurements, production mapping and product pricing.

Market Linkage and Sustainability

We will act as the bridge between the great traditional artists, performing arts experts to the global market with providing them the support for market access

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